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How to Identify Common Insect Associates of the Southern Pine Beetle
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Cerambycidae


 

Cerambycidae: Cerambycids are the largest insect associates of the SPB. They characteristically have very long antennae, often longer than the body. All cerambycid larvae are cylindrical, fleshy white, and legless (fig. 25). They taper gradually from anterior to posterior, and are not C-shaped. They have darkened, strong, well-developed mandibles. Cerambycids taper less abruptly than buprestid larvae, and do not possess an inverted "V" on the large first segment as do the buprestids (fig. 26)

  • Monochamus Serville (fig. 27): Monochamus spp., or pine sawyers, are 17.5-30.0 mm long as adults, and are mottled gray and brown. The thorax has a stout spine on either side. The male antennae are 2l/2 times body length; female antennae are 11/2 times body length.

 

  • Neacanthocinus obsoletus (Olivier) (fig. 28): N. obsoletus adults are smaller (7.0-14.0 mm) than other sawyers and have black patterns on a primarily gray elytra. The elytra is distinctly punctate nearly to the apex. Lateral tubercles are present on the pronotum, and the legs are successively longer from front to rear.
Figure 25
Figure 25

Figure 26
Figure 26

Figure 28
Figure 28

 

Figure 27
Figure 27


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